Weekly RoundUp (7/5-7/11)

Monday:

China is set to unfold new privacy laws, which may cause a shake-up in big tech. A letter from Hong Kong’s privacy commissioner noted, “introducing sanctions aimed at individuals is not aligned with global norms and trends.” As many regions continue to grapple with the Delta variant, the UK is set to relax Covid restrictions. It is reported that Johnson will unveil a four-part plan. The remaining sections of the Miami condo that collapsed in late June were recently given the all-clear to be demolished. Over 80 citizens from Japan are missing following a landslide that ravaged Atami, three have been confirmed dead.

Tuesday:

Climate activist Jessica Recnizek has received an 8-year prison sentence for her “eco-sabotage” on the Dakota Access Pipeline. Along with another climate activist, Recnizek set fire to machinery and destroyed valves. WHO emergency director, Dr. Mike Ryan stated “I think, overall, we’ve made a very premature run, rush back to ‘full normality.’ And I think we’re going to pay a price for that, because we’re not there with vaccination, the variants are really there, and we haven’t protected enough people.” COVID-19 cases are surging in Indonesia, Russia, and the UK due to the Delta Variant, despite a majority of the UK being vaccinated. At the White House Fourth of July celebration, President Biden stated that getting vaccinated is the “most patriotic thing you can do”.  

Wednesday:

Two statues of Confederate generals were removed in Charlottesville, Virginia on Saturday, July 10, 2021. The first statue of Robert E. Lee was removed from Market Street Park just after 8:00 am. Around two hours later at 10:00 am the second statue of Stonewall Jackson was taken down from Court Square Park. As the statue of Lee was being removed Charlottesville mayor, Nikuyah Walker spoke to reporters saying that “(removing the statues) is one small step closer to the goal of helping Charlottesville, Virginia, and America grapple with its sin of being willing to destroy Black people for economic gains.” On Wednesday, July 7th, 2021 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that $50 million dollars have been added to their funding in an attempt to better air pollution monitoring and improve air quality in minority communities. The Biden Administration has been working on increasing its budget to fight environmental injustices and focus on new climate policies. They also aim to benefit communities of color and low-income communities who have been the most negatively impacted by poor environmental quality. A fire broke out on Thursday, July 8th, 2021 at the Hashem Foods Ltd. factory in Rupganj, Bangladesh. With 52 people killed and another 50 injured the fire was brought under control as of Friday afternoon. The owner of the factory and seven other staff members have been arrested during the investigation of the fire. 

Thursday:

President Jovenel Moise of Haiti was assassinated by a group of foreigners on Wednesday morning. Haiti faces further instability due to rising levels of poverty and violence. All recorded COVID-19 deaths in the state of Maryland during the month of June were unvaccinated individuals. In Colombia, more than 70 people have been killed in the streets by Colombian security forces. Protests have been ongoing in Colombia due to a “controversial proposed tax overhaul”. 

Friday:

President Biden has announced the conclusion of the United State’s “mission” in Afghanistan by August 31st and will withdraw US troops. President Biden stated, “We did not go to Afghanistan to nation-build. And it’s the right and the responsibility of the Afghan people alone to decide their future and how they want to run their country. … I will not send another generation of Americans to war in Afghanistan with no reasonable expectation of achieving a different outcome.”Japanese authorities have declared a state of emergency ahead of the Tokyo Olympics due to a surge in COVID-19 cases. In-person spectators have been banned from all games. Two Haitian Americans were arrested as suspects for being part of the group responsible for the assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moise. Haitian authorities have stated the assassination was carried out by a group of 28, at least 3 of them being dead and 8 remaining at large.  

Saturday:

The Biden administration’s plans to mobilize door-to-door canvassing to increase vaccination rates have recently caught the attention of many Americans. Many GOP congress members have fired back, claiming that the tactic is covert coercion and the first phase of stripping gun rights. A recent phone call between Joe Biden and Vladimir Putin focused on cyber attacks. While giving the Russian leader a warning, Biden noted the United States reserves the right to “defend its people and its critical infrastructure.” Five Palo Alto police officers have filed suit against Palo Alto and its police department. ABC writes, “In a civil complaint filed in Santa Clara County Superior Court, the officers claim they were “forced to physically pass and confront the mural” on Hamilton Avenue each time they entered the department. At issue were elements they consider to be offensive and discriminatory, including a portrait of Black Liberation Army member and FBI fugitive, Joanne Chesimard, also known as Assata Shakur.”

Sunday:

A case that involved sexual assault allegations between 6000 patients and Gynecologist, James Heaps, was settled June 12th in court and decided that each patient would receive between $2,500 and $250,000 in settlement payout. James previously worked at UCLA, and an investigation as to why the abuse was allowed to go on for so long is being conducted. A statue depicting Lewis and Clark and Native woman Sacagawea was taken down in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 10th due to the city council having a unanimous vote. Many wanted the statue taken down due to the fact that Sacagawea was cowering below the colonizers, while others felt that it simply put Lewis and Clark on a pedestal and allowed for them to be praised. Monday afternoon, Mexican government officials reported that 68 human rights and environmental activists have been killed during the current administration, and 43 journalists have been murdered. Residents are questioning President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who took office on Dec. 1, 2018, and had promised to protect journalists.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: